i hate when i get irrational and i get annoyed. i hate that i let my emotions get the better of me. i hate that i get so upset.

today was fannoying: fucking annoying.

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That’s what I realized today. I used to have one password for everything until one account got hacked and then I had to change that up. Now, I’ve set my password to expire every 72 days on hotmail, I’m finding I have to reassign a mnemonic device every so often to help me remember my passwords, oh, and I’ve also forgotten every secret question and answer designed to help me protect my passwords.

Maybe it’s a sign we log in too much.

Maybe, I can’t remember cause I’m just getting old. ūüôā

In this crazy crazy world, where we’re so concerned about who to let in and who to leave out, we’ve created systems to protect ourselves. However, what we don’t realize is that we’ve also increased our chances of locking ourselves out. There’s not always a password reset button at the ready. There won’t always be a second chance.¬†

Take risks, leave the gates open, tell the border guard to take a day off. Get to know your neighbours and give them a copy of your key in case you ever get locked out. Or introduce them to your pets so that in case of a fire, they’ll save them.

It frequently dawns on me how unique my childhood is and how differently I remember the ’80’s from how my friends remember it.

A few months ago, we were tossing around the idea of throwing an ’80’s party and as everyone contributed their stories of atari, street fighter, walkmans, black Michael Jackson, etc, I half-jokingly said “people power.”¬† I didn’t get blank stares from people because I was among friends who remembered hearing about events in the Philippines that led to great historical change.¬† I don’t remember just hearing about it though.¬† I was 3 years old, living in Manila, in San Juan, 20 minutes away from EDSA and Ortigas.¬† I remember my parents coming home with indelible ink on their thumbs after voting.¬† I remember¬†sticking¬†Cory and¬†Doy stickers on our beige Tamaraw. ¬† I remember confusing the words-soldier and shoulder, because there were always “soldiers/shoulders around” and my Papa always said “pull back your shoulders/soldiers, stand up straight.”

This month, People Power comes to life for an audience¬†that¬†may remember it distantly, to an audience¬†that heard about it, and to an audience¬†that may have never heard about it until now.¬†¬† Carlos Bulosan Theatre, one of Kapisanan Philippine Centre for Arts and Culture’s community partners, will be mounting People Power at Theatre Passe Muraille (www.passemuraille.on.ca).¬† It’s a revolution in poetry, movement and music.¬† Previews begin on Friday the 11th of April and opens April 16th.¬† Tuesday-Saturday performances are always at 8 pm.¬† Sunday performances are on at 2:30 pm.¬† Tickets are available through the Passe Muraille box office.

I hope you’ll come out to support the brilliant collective of playwrights and performers. I also hope you’ll enrich what you know about the ’80’s and remember that for some of us, it wasn’t just about the games we played or the music we listened to but also about witnessing change and revolution.